Website structure: how to setup your site for high conversion

Website Structure: How to Setup Your Site for High Conversions

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Website structure: how to setup your site for high conversion

When it comes to website structure, there are two main benefits to putting a little planning and know-how behind setting up your site:

1) Better stats for Google (lower bounce rate, longer avg. time on site, etc.)

2) Higher conversions… whether that’s sales or signups

I follow some pretty simple guidelines for my own sites that definitely work for me, so I’ll go over some of those in this post so that you can use some of them on your own sites.

Tips for a High-Converting Website Structure

A static homepage: I don’t do this with Strayblogger yet, but I do it on most of my sites. The main idea behind this is so that you control exactly what your visitors see when they land on your homepage. Your homepage will be the most visited page on your site by far, so it’s a good place to put your most valuable(both to you and your readers) information. If you’re not aware, WordPress by default uses a dynamic ‘posts’ page as your homepage that will show your most recent posts… a blog in other words.

When you use a static homepage, you go in and choose a “page”, not a post, that will be your homepage and will always look and stay the same unless you manually edit the page of course. To set that up, go into ‘Settings’, and then ‘Reading’, and you’ll see this:

You just check the ‘static page’ option, and then choose the page you want as your homepage. If you want a dedicated blog page, you would just setup a “page” titled ‘Blog’, and choose that as your ‘Posts page’ below the Front page option.

Some ideas of what to put on your homepage

First of all, your homepage should basically be an article about the overall topic of your site. Shoot for 700 to 1,000 words so that it’s substantial… both for human readers and search engines, and then as you build your site out you’ll be able to add links to your main pages right from the content of the homepage. If you look at my stroller site, you’ll see this in action:

The links on your homepage within your content shouldn’t just link to your money pages… that’s the wrong place to link to your money pages. Your homepage should link to your main category pages, and those main category pages will then have links to your different articles in that category. So basically what you have is a hierarchy of pages like this:

site structure pages hierarchy

You should choose anywhere from 3 to 6 “categories” that any article on your site will fit into. Then, you create a “page” in WordPress to serve as that category page. Then go into your menu options and list these category pages in your navigation. First you have to do it under “Appearance” > “Menus” like this:

wordpress profits theme menu options

In Profits Theme, you choose ‘Top Navigation 2′, because that’s the menu under your logo… that’s just the way I setup all my sites, you can do it whatever way you want. I just prefer one main Nav bar under my site logo such here on Strayblogger. In Profits Theme, this is under Profits Theme > Site Options > Display, and then check the box to Remove/Collapse Top Navigation #1:

profits theme navigation options

Then, on each category page, you make it another general article about that category or topic, and then link to the pages within that category. Here’s another example from my stroller site:

What this does is it gives your visitors a lot of places to go, and this increases your avg. time on site and avg. number of pages that visitor views. The longer you can keep a visitor on your site, the higher chance they’ll subscribe or buy something you’re promoting. These improved metrics also increase the quality of your site in the eyes of Google, which will improve your search engine rankings as well.

As you continue to build more and more pages, you should spend a little time going through and interlinking your articles. If you have a page titled “How to Cook Trout”, then in your other articles whenever you  mention cooking trout or eating trout, you would link back to your page on “How to Cook Trout”. Interlinking is another thing that boosts your search engine rankings, mainly because it get’s people viewing more pages per visit and staying on your site longer.

What to Put in Your Sidebars

Your sidebars are very important to the success of your site. This is where the bulk of your money-making actions will take place: 1)people subscribing to your list and 2) visiting your money pages.

As you can see in the shot below, I have a simple optin on my top-right sidebar, which is the best place to put it.

Profits Theme sidebar optin

I know I beat this like a dead horse, but if you’re not building a list yet- it will drastically reduce the amount of time it takes you to build up your traffic, sales, and income. You can also watch the list building webinar if you haven’t yet…

I know this will get asked, so to get an optin form like the one you see above, you can either use Optin Skin, or Profits Theme has a sidebar optin widget you can use. In either case, you simply get your form HTML from iContact and paste it into the widget where it says “Paste Autoresponder code here”:

The next best way to use your sidebar space is to link to your money pages. It’s not a bad idea to include a couple of your best pages, whether they’re money pages or not- this goes back to the idea that you want your visitors to see your best stuff when they visit your site.

The easiest way to list the specific pages you want is to first create a custom menu in your ‘Menus’ options inside WordPress:

Then, you need to simply drag the “Custom Menu” widget into your sidebar inside the ‘Widgets’ menu:

Profits Theme custom menu widget

Putting your Amazon.com affiliate disclaimer on every page: If you’re an Amazon.com affiliate, you need to have a disclosure statement on any page with Amazon affiliate links that discloses your affiliate relationship with Amazon. An easy way to this so that you don’t have to edit every single page is to use the “widgetized footer” feature in Profits Theme. Here’s what it looks like in action:

To set it up, it’s under Profits Theme > Design Options > Layout. Then you find this section, and make sure it’s un-checked.

Once you’ve done that, then you need to configure the widgets inside your “Widget” options:

At this point the only other thing I can think of that you might be wondering is, “How do I link to all my other pages besides my money pages in my sidebar?”

To answer that let’s recap: You setup your homepage which will link to ‘category pages’ and other main pages, and then on your category pages you’ll link to all the articles within that category. Then, you want to interlink your article pages wherever it makes sense to, and that way there will be a way to access any given page within a few clicks from the home page.

The idea of putting your best content directly accessible on the homepage and from any page in the sidebar is that it will be your individual pages that bring in most of the traffic, and then the main thing people click on is your homepage link, and from there they’ll funnel to your money pages… that’s how it works hypothetically and it will work that way the majority of the time. Some visitors will bounce after just a few seconds no matter how good your site and content are, but if you’ll take some time to plan out your site and set it up correctly, over time it will perform much better both in terms of traffic and revenue than it would if you just kept publishing pages and didn’t do anything to organize them.

Okay- I hope you liked this post and learned something useful… Please share/tweet/+1 this below and leave a comment or question.

 

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74 Comments

  • Shawn

    Reply Reply April 18, 2012

    Hi Nate,

    This post came just in time. Being new to WordPress, I was really struggling with understanding the widgets and especially how to use the category feature. Thanks for sharing.

    Shawn

    • Nate

      Reply Reply April 18, 2012

      No problem Shawn- I’ve got a lot of questions about this so I figured this would help.

  • bulkarn@yahoo.com

    Reply Reply April 18, 2012

    Thanks, Nate. I am a member of your NVT group. THis is a real newbie question, but I assume I would follow that training to set up the wordpress theme?

    • Nate

      Reply Reply April 18, 2012

      Yeah there’s a video in there about setting it up. Once you have WordPress installed, you just download Profits Theme from their members area and then upload it from inside your WordPress site under ‘Themes’.

      That’s how you do it with any theme, it doesn’t have to be Profits Theme.

  • Ken

    Reply Reply April 18, 2012

    Hi, I’m on your mailing list and was curious about the topic of site structure. So that brought me here and I read this article.

    Your article is very good, indeed, and you obviously put some time into it.

    Do you typically only have a maximum of six categories on your niche sites? Just curious and you don’t have to be specific if you don’t want to.

    I do not have any kind of authority site or really any sites. I’m a writer who has done a lot of IM in the past and am not sure about doing it, again.

    It seems to me that an authority site using a blog would have a need for potentially many more categories. Have you made any sites like this?

    Oh, also… I think it would be very good for SEO purposes to really go all out and make many posts and cat pages longer in word count. I have read that long articles, 1000 wrds plus, can often pull in tons of single search keyword phrases. I guess these phrases would amount to being LSI type phrases.

    Have you tried that on your niche blogs? If not, may be a good idea if you do SEO.

    Thanks for the good post.

    Ken

    • Nate

      Reply Reply April 18, 2012

      Ken- Thank you, I did spend a lot of time on this one.

      You can have as many categories as makes sense, but I wouldn’t go past 10 probably… that’s not a hard and fast rule though either.

      Yeah I have sites exactly like I’ve outlined- but I don’t like having too many categories because it’s too much for visitors at once. That’s my personal preference.

      You’re right about word count- 700+ words is a good benchmark for articles, and 1,000 is even better. And yes, it does work very well for pulling in a lot of long tail traffic.

      • Ken

        Reply Reply April 18, 2012

        Hi Nate,

        The comments about long tail traffic reminded me of an article I read at Wordtracker a while ago. I’ll post the link to it if you don’t mind.

        This article is a great illustration about what single search terms can do for your site. In sites I’ve had in the past, I always noticed a large number of single search terms which is indicative of long tail traffic.

        You may have seen this already. But other readers should get something worthwhile out of it.

        You’ll see how a single article got almost 100, 000 visits from an amazing 44,000 keyword phrases – all long tail. I did not look for it, just now, but I think the article length is about 1200 words.

        Here’s the link, non-affiliate.

        http://www.wordtracker.com/academy/long-tail-keyword-research

        Enjoy,

        Ken

        • Nate

          Reply Reply April 18, 2012

          Ken, Yeah longtail traffic definitely adds up… and the longer your articles the more keywords they’ll pull traffic for.

  • Larry

    Reply Reply April 18, 2012

    Nate,

    Another Great Post, thanks!!! Finally you’re turning it up a notch and putting out a lot of great content. You should launch more WSO’s, that seems to get the creative juices flowing.

    I got a quick question for you…. is there anyway to create a “Premium” Theme look to the Profits Theme if you use a Static Home page.

    I think having a good intro describing what your website is about(like you described in your post about using your best post on homepage) but I would really like to use more images to show categories on the homepage. That way, someone sees a interesting picture, they are most likely going to click it, even if there is NO text on it, just to see what it’s all about. Something like all the different Magazine style themes use.

    What’s your thoughts on that?

    • Nate

      Reply Reply April 18, 2012

      Thanks Larry.

      Yeah you can get Profits Theme to look however you want, and using images like you say on your homepage would help with that.

      90% of the look and feel of your site will come from your site logo and your background, even though the background seems like a minor detail.

      You can fully customize both of those things in PT. To get a textured background in PT, you just need a 100×100 image of the texture you want and then tile it… you probably already know that though.

  • Steven

    Reply Reply April 18, 2012

    Hey Nate, this is really helpful, thank you for posting :)

    • Nate

      Reply Reply April 18, 2012

      No problem Steven- I’m happy to do it.

  • Steve A

    Reply Reply April 18, 2012

    Hey Nate, great roundup – thanks :)

    I’ve been working on a site following your 60 minutes WSO and have been wondering about the static front page thing for a while… I have it showing blog posts at the moment but I knew deep down that static was probably better – which is a shame because I love how my woo theme presents the featured posts etc lol!

    Based on where you have positioned your opt-in box, would I be right in thinking that your ultimate goal for your double strollers site is to get someone on the list, even if it sacrifices the visibility of your money pages?

    Cheers
    Steve

    • Nate

      Reply Reply April 18, 2012

      Steve- If you paid for a Woo Theme and you like how it’s setup then you don’t need to use a static homepage. This is just my personal preference.

      As far as the double stroller site, it actually isn’t my main goal. Clicks to Amazon are the main goal, but I don’t want that to happen until they’ve read some of the content on the site. The list will just increase earnings by a certain percentage… usually between 20-50% in my experience… so it’s totally worth doing.

  • Vlad

    Reply Reply April 18, 2012

    This is some good stuff Nate and and is it happens, it answers two of my most pertinent questions. A I am following your “60 Minutes to $100 Days” method, I’ve been wondering about the exact site structure and how to achieve that in Profits Theme.

    I have managed to figure some of this out myself, but this post just solidified it for me and gave me a few more excellent pointers to boot!

    Vlad

    • Nate

      Reply Reply April 18, 2012

      Thank you Vlad- glad it helped.

  • Colin

    Reply Reply April 18, 2012

    Hi Nate,

    Just what I was looking for, very clear and informative post.

    Why can’t everyone spell it out as clearly as you do!

    I have a newbie question for you…. I already have a site set up using a theme which won’t allow me to put up posts other than review type ones. I need to be able to add informative articles and may well change to the theme you recommend.

    My question is, what’s the easiest way to go about swapping a site over from one theme to another without loosing all of the content linking etc and ranking in Google?

    i.e. if I just rip out the existing theme won’t my site be all over the place and I’ll get penalized by Google whilst I try putting it all back together?

    Sorry if this seems a silly question but so far I have got someone to do the site build for me but now I can see that I need to take control myself and follow a route similar to what you have laid out for us here in your great post :)

    All the best Nate

    Colin

    • Nate

      Reply Reply April 18, 2012

      Thanks Collin I appreciate that.

      If you switch themes, you’ll have to do a little cleanup but it won’t affect your Google rankings or anything. My sites have been hacked a few times and one time they were down for over 2 days and I was terrified that Google would de-list them for being down that long but nothing happened.

      So switching themes won’t cause that… just make the switch when you have a few hours to clean things up afterwards.

      • Colin

        Reply Reply April 19, 2012

        Thanks Nate, really appreciate your input :)

        Colin

        • Nate

          Reply Reply April 21, 2012

          No problem Colin, you’re welcome.

  • kasia

    Reply Reply April 18, 2012

    Hi Nate,

    Great post. I’ve been hearing this a lot but you really laid it out step by step really clearly. Thanks

    You say it should be a page, but could you use a sticky post that really fills out and lays out all of the category structure like you suggest. I’m not contradicting you here. I just don’t know and would really appreciate it if you could clear this up for me

    Kasia

    • Nate

      Reply Reply April 18, 2012

      Thank you Kasia. You’re right, you could just set a post as a sticky so that it’s always on top and accomplish the same thing, the only difference is that with that setup, your homepage keywords that you set in the Platinum SEO settings are applied to the blog as a whole instead of a dedicated static page, and in my experience getting the homepage ranked for its keywords is easier with a static page.

      That’s the main reason why I do it that way.

      • kasia

        Reply Reply April 19, 2012

        Thanks Nate. You’re awesome :)

  • Patricia

    Reply Reply April 18, 2012

    Nate another great post. I love your clear, no b/s style and useful input. Just bought Amazon Niche Mastery on your recommendation, can’t wait to get stuck into it.
    Thank you!

    • Nate

      Reply Reply April 18, 2012

      You’re welcome Patricia- thanks for reading. Erica’s course is good, you’ll find it useful.

  • Daniel Hicks

    Reply Reply April 18, 2012

    In your double stroller review site example I took a look and it wasn’t clear to me, but are all your articles done as pages? You do not use posts at all on the site is that correct?

    There is a plugin called SEO Ultimate that is supposed to help develop a silo structure on your site and provide interlinking. I was wondering if you had looked at it or had a opinion on it — I will probably try it on a new site soon but my older sites I am afraid it would cause a lot of permalink changes that would be hard to manage.

    • Nate

      Reply Reply April 18, 2012

      Daniel- I put up the first few articles as posts on that site and switched to pages. Now I pretty much use pages only on most of my sites, unless I setup a dedicated blog for the site like I mentioned in the post.

      I’m not familiar with SEO Ultimate… it sounds good but it might do what you said and screw up permalinks on an old site.

  • bobby s

    Reply Reply April 18, 2012

    great info as usual. do you not like to include search boxes on your sites?

    • Nate

      Reply Reply April 18, 2012

      Thanks Bobby- I don’t use search boxes on niche sites until they have a lot of content. I heard a conversion expert speaking once and he pointed out that unless you have a ton of content on a site, a search function is a bad thing since chances are the visitor won’t find what they’re looking for.

  • Mary Chicoine

    Reply Reply April 18, 2012

    Nate – thanks for the very useful site structure information. I’ve always wondered about Category layouts and it’s good to have the info. Also, thanks for the Amazon discloure info –
    I had neglected to put it on my site.

    All the best,
    Mary C

    • Nate

      Reply Reply April 18, 2012

      Thanks Mary-glad it was useful.

  • Joe

    Reply Reply April 19, 2012

    Do you ever use sub-categories? I am having trouble on deciding how to setup my site. I use WordPress a lot but only on small niche sites not big authority ones like I am now starting.

    Say I am doing a site on weight training. I was thinking of having a category for each type of equipment eg dumbbells, kettle bells, benches, etc but that would end up being 10s of categories.

    Then when I add in my training tips articles then it would be even more categories.

    Or should I just do one category for weight training equipment and lump them all in together?

    Or have sub categories for each type of equipment?

    Or is my niche too broad?

    Confusing!

    • bobby s

      Reply Reply April 20, 2012

      hey joe, maybe your categories are too specific. you could make your categories more broad so you don’t have ’10s’ of them. then just sprinkle training tips throughout those.

      just an idea. but i dont’ think your niche seems to broad.

    • Nate

      Reply Reply April 21, 2012

      Joe- I would narrow it down to 5 or 6 categories… then if you have to go to 7 or 8, but I don’t think you’d want more than that.

  • Rik

    Reply Reply April 20, 2012

    Hi Nate, at last some clarity on uses static pages. Great straightforward advice. thank you. I am am NVT member and purchased Profitthemes to build a couple of authority sites. I am currently using Profitthemes on a local install of wordpress so I can experiment. It has some many options but it is not all that intuitive – best way seems to play around. I am coming to mindset that I am going to steer clear of adsense and focus on monetizing via affiliate and membership programmes which PT fully supports. One quick question… how did you customise the Optin graphics and colour scheme for the PT optin on the Best Stroller Reviews. Love the podcasts (thats how I found you!). God Bless Rik

    • Nate

      Reply Reply April 21, 2012

      Rik- I’m glad you’ve like my post and podcast, thanks.

      I used a plugin called OptinSkin to customize the optin box on that site. There’s a link to it on my resources page to it. Cheers.

  • Bart

    Reply Reply April 20, 2012

    Nate, great great post. You must’ve been reading my mind because i had questions on this stuff. What about this: if you have 6 posts on one page, and 3 Adsense ads on each post, will google penalize for having 18 ads on one page? By penalize I mean two things: one is their simple three add limit, the other is penalizing in the serps for too many ads. Bart.

    • Nate

      Reply Reply April 21, 2012

      I’m glad it helped Bart. I’m not totally clear what you’re asking… Do you mean if your posts are listed on your homepage and each of them have 3 Adsense units? If so, that should be ok because each post is it’s own page, and that’s just how blogs are setup… you might want to ask Adsense support for a definitive answer on that though.

  • bobby s

    Reply Reply April 20, 2012

    nate, i was curious, once a page has like 20 or more pages, and eventually more, do you still just use a long list at the bottom of that category page to link to all the other articles in that category?

    seems like it could get really long

    • Nate

      Reply Reply April 21, 2012

      Yeah I’ll keep listing them- that only helps a page.

  • Neill

    Reply Reply April 20, 2012

    Nate, I think this is the most useful instructional post I’ve ever seen, from you or anyone else. Many thanks. Now a question – How do you feel about having the sidebar on the left side of the page? There are some who advocate that since almost all heatmaps show the most activity in the upper left quarter of the page.

    Thanks again for your efforts – Neill

    PS – Thanks to Ken for that wordtracker link. Very informative.

    .

    • Nate

      Reply Reply April 21, 2012

      Neill- Thanks buddy, I’m glad you liked it that much.

      I don’t think the sidebar on the left really matters… I’ve seen heatmaps as well that say the left side is the hottest. I’m just use to using the right side, but really it’s just personal preference.

  • Logan L

    Reply Reply April 23, 2012

    once again you have done it!! Thanks for your insight Nate!

    • Nate

      Reply Reply April 23, 2012

      Thanks Logan- Glad you like it.

  • KS

    Reply Reply April 23, 2012

    Hi Nate,

    As with the chorus of readers here, thank you for a very well written article on website structure.

    I do have something which I want to check my understanding. For the category pages, these are populated by your blog posts which have been tagged with those categories?

    e.g. the “Featured Products” page would be populated with blog posts which have been tagged as “Featured Products”?

    Additionally, these category pages would have at least one unique article written in that page about that particular subject.
    Would that be correct?

    Final question is about your stating that you start off with blog posts, but later on you move on to creating pages instead.
    What is the reason for that? And, in this case, wouldn’t you lose the autoposting to the category pages since you can’t tag a page like you can a post (or can you?)

    Hope my questions make sense,
    KS

    • KS

      Reply Reply April 23, 2012

      Hi Nate,

      I just created a Featured Products PAGE.
      I have also tagged some blog POSTS as “Featured Products”.

      I created the MENU to have a the Featured Products PAGE as one of its elements.

      When I refreshed the page, the blog POSTS do not show up in the Featured Products Page. I have to create a Featured Products page which is made up of the Featured Products CATEGORY for the products to show.

      However, I want to have a sticky, or at least a short article about the products at the top of the page, and let the autopost of the blog posts to the rest of the page.

      Any suggestions?

      You can check out the website here : http://ksbookworks.com

      Thanks,
      KS

      • Nate

        Reply Reply April 24, 2012

        Your site looks good.

        Yeah you can do what you’re wanting easier if you use a static front page. The blog post above shows you how to do it.

    • Nate

      Reply Reply April 24, 2012

      KS- you’re welcome I’m glad you liked it.

      If you use all post, then the category pages are automatically created for you as you tag them.

      If you do it like my blog post outlines, you’ll be using only pages and you’ll have to create each category page by yourself. I prefer using pages.

      The only reason I started using posts was just chance… no reason behind it but I never took the time to take the content and put into pages.. I just left them as posts.

      • KS

        Reply Reply April 25, 2012

        Nate,

        Thanks for checking out my site and your comments.

        This would mean for every product I review, I would post to a page. And then link that page to a “Featured Product” page. Ultimately, the Featured Product page would be showing links to all the different products. The individual product pages themselves would not be directly accessible from the navigation menu. ** Okay, I think I get it **

        What do you think of the strategy to do this:
        1. Write all Posts into a blog (including the product reviews).
        2. Tag the product review posts with “Featured Products”
        3. Copy and paste the product review posts into a new page
        4. Link the product review page to the “Featured Products” page, where appropriate ie a recommended product

        Doing it this way the product review can be accessed from the blog post as well as the Featured Product page.

        Would this also improve the SEO with the extra links from the blog posts and product pages?

        –KS

        • Nate

          Reply Reply April 25, 2012

          Yeah that’s one way of doing it… there’s not a perfect way but what you outlined will work fine, and the inter-linking will help.

          • KS

            April 29, 2012

            Nate,

            I was at a webinar last night and the presenter was saying that if we use tags and categories, then there would be duplicate content on the site when google crawls it.

            Is this concern legit?

            –KS

          • Nate

            May 3, 2012

            I don’t think so… that doesn’t make sense with WordPress being the biggest site platform out there and Google knowing how it works.

            That doesn’t make sense to me but I’m not on Google’s webspam team either.

  • ollie

    Reply Reply April 24, 2012

    Hello Nate,

    TOP tips.

    I goes with what I have learnt lately, about setting up sites, whether monetized via Adsense or Amazon. Structuring sites like this greatly provides tons of value to the user prompting easier social sharing.

    One thing though, assuming you have an Amazon site that is set up this way, lets say in the Crock Pots niche, and you have categories such as Crock Pots under $100, and another category for Microwave Resistant Crock Pots. If you put the same article reviewing a specific Crock Pot, under both categories (because it fits both categories), wont that raise a duplicate penalty issue?

    I hope you get what I mean.

    Dude, YOU ROCK!

    Thanks!

    • Nate

      Reply Reply April 24, 2012

      Thanks Ollie I appreciate it.

      No, what you described wouldn’t be duplicate penalty at all, that’s completely fine.

  • Kyle

    Reply Reply April 27, 2012

    Hey nate,

    I love the possibility to increase conversions, cause lets face it, thats why we do what we do. Two questions though-

    1 – Google stats affect your pr? Never knew that.
    2 – How the hell do you find a niche like double strollers!?!?

    haha im jealous.

    • Nate

      Reply Reply April 29, 2012

      Kyle- Yeah they do. They are really just a way of Google’s bots understanding if people like your content or not.

      Double strollers… Purely a combination of checking ideas on Amazon and then looking at the related keyword data.

  • Joe

    Reply Reply April 29, 2012

    So you are not actually using the categories in WordPress as you are using pages which cannot have a category?

    When you say a category page you just mean the ‘home page’ for the pages in a particular category?

    If you don’t use posts you don’t get to use tags and categories in WP; is this a bad thing?

    I’ve signed up for the 60 Mins Mastermind so looking forward to asking these questions in the forum!

    • Nate

      Reply Reply April 29, 2012

      Joe- Yeah if you use only pages then you don’t use WordPress’s regular category tags. You can use all posts so that all that stuff is built in, but the main reason I like building my own “category” pages is being able to put an article or other content on that same page so that the category page can rank for a chosen keyword as well… usually a more competitive one with higher searches.

  • cobi

    Reply Reply June 12, 2012

    Nate, i recently bought your 60 min to $100,
    how do i remove the date on every post just like what I saw on double stroller review

    • Nate

      Reply Reply June 13, 2012

      Cobi- It’s a option in Profits Theme… but not all themes have that option.

  • constantine

    Reply Reply June 29, 2012

    Hi Nate,

    so you don’t use posts at all and interlink only pages?

  • Neill

    Reply Reply July 20, 2012

    I’m seeing that there are no “posts” in this site setup, only
    “pages”. Is that correct?

    • Nate

      Reply Reply July 21, 2012

      Neill- that’s correct. But, it primarily should be your own preference. I have sites that are regular blogs, where everything is a post, such as Strayblogger. Then there are mixes, but if a site is going to be 50 pages or less total I would use all pages.

  • Helen Page

    Reply Reply July 22, 2012

    Nate, is this different from the training? I thought you advised using pages on the authority sites with 150-180 pages.

    • Nate

      Reply Reply July 23, 2012

      Helen- It’s not different… just comes down to personal preference. I have sites I’ve built both ways, all posts, all pages, or a combination… it really doesn’t matter.

      I can see it being confusing when you’re new to WordPress as you want to choose one way before you get started, so if you’ve started with all pages just stick to that.

  • Helen Page

    Reply Reply July 24, 2012

    Hi, Nate, thanks for the clarification. I just went over this post and all the comments to refresh my memory. As you know, as I do my first site, my learning curve is quite steep. I want to point out something about sidebars that had me stuck until someone on the forum pointed it out.

    I was having trouble getting my optin and my customized list of favorite articles to show on the sidebar. I would create them but only one would show. Turns out, I thought I had to use a separate sidebar for each widget. Chrisa told me to put both in sidebar 1 unless I had optimized sidebar 2, which I didn’t even know how to do. So put them both in sidebar 1 and it worked. Hope this helps someone.

    Thanks to all your training I totally understand this post now, where the first time I read it, it was like Greek to me. Thanks so much for your great help along the way.

    Helen

  • Steve A

    Reply Reply July 29, 2012

    Hey Nate,

    I just came here after seeing your latest broadcast email and read the whole entire article thinking to myself how great info this is.

    I scrolled half way through the comments and saw one from “Steve A” and thought to myself, what are the chances of another me?

    Then I realised that it was me and I had read this whole thing before when you originally posted it!

    I guess the reason I’m telling you this is that it goes to show how valuable it is to keep reminding ourselves of what we think we already know!

    Your site is a great resource Nate and I appreciate being able to come back here and reminding myself of all this good stuff.

    P.S the site I created when you first released your $100 days WSO is now up to around 80-100 visitors per day and I’ve not even kept up with the posting schedule very well. I have around 30-40 articles and the same number of product reviews and the long tail is awesome! My amazon clickthroughs aren’t that great yet but I have some optimisation to do in terms of site structure and enticing titles etc. Those who do click through are buying something around 10% of the time though which i think is pretty good.

    Thanks again
    Steve

    • Nate

      Reply Reply July 29, 2012

      Steve- That is funny, and it’s also a good lesson to me.

      I need to go back and load up a lot more of my posts into my AR- I only have a few in there.

      Awesome results as well… keep working on it.

      Thanks for the comment.

  • Mike Sweetman

    Reply Reply August 2, 2012

    Just spent some time restructuring my main site…thanks for emailing this out, and reminding me about the post!

  • Irwin

    Reply Reply August 6, 2012

    Nate –

    Solid, solid post. Hard to believe you didn’t charge for this content!

    Irwin

    • Nate

      Reply Reply August 6, 2012

      Thanks Irwin- yeah it took awhile to put together.

  • Clare Johnson

    Reply Reply August 11, 2012

    Hey Nate

    Just wanted to drop you a line to tell you how much I enjoyed reading your post, this is awesome info and really valuable to me, thank you so much!

    • Nate

      Reply Reply August 16, 2012

      You’re welcome Clare- thanks for the comment.

  • Minka Kelly

    Reply Reply April 29, 2013

    I am happy reading your article. It is most useful for me. I sure will learn it over and over. Thank you.

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